July 11th, 2006

America’s Regional Religions

I came across an interesting graphic today that shows America’s religions by region, as of six years ago (click to enlarge):

My observations:

  1. I’d like to see this same graph, but have it also reflect activity rates within that religion. So, the updated graph would use color intensity to represent activity rates. The brighter the color is, the higher that religion’s average activity rate is. Based on this article, Catholics have a 28% rate, and Protestants have a 20% rate. I’d imagine we’d see a lot less blue if this reflected actual church-going rates.
  2. That’s a lot of freakin’ red, dude.
  3. What’s with the random isolated Mormon splotches? Southwest Oregon, the northern tip of Idaho, etc.
  4. I had no idea there were that many Lutherans. Why north-central USA?
  5. The northeastern states seems to have an overwhelming majority of (declared) Catholics.
  6. Utah is totally brown. Couldn’t they have picked a better color… say, orange? Or maybe in representation of our state’s staple, green Jello, they could have let us swap colors with the Methodists.

The website where this graph is located also has more graphs worth checking out.

9 Responses to “America’s Regional Religions”

  1. July 12, 2006 at 11:49 am #

    “I had no idea there were that many Lutherans. Why north-central USA? ”

    Scandinavian immigrants.

  2. the narrator
    July 12, 2006 at 12:47 pm #

    I’d like to see this same graph, but have it also reflect activity rates within that religion. So, the updated graph would use color intensity to represent activity rates. The brighter the color is, the higher that religion’s average activity rate is. Based on this article, Catholics have a 28% rate, and Protestants have a 20% rate. I’d imagine we’d see a lot less blue if this reflected actual church-going rates.

    In 2000, the church claimed just over 5 million members. In 2001, only 2.7 million members claimed to be lds. Only half of the 5 “million strong” in the US claim to even be mormons. I believe nationally, activity rate is about 30%, so only about 60% of mormons who claim to be mormon even attend.

  3. Connor
    July 12, 2006 at 12:51 pm #

    Yeah, I’ve heard these same numbers. I actually heard that the LDS church has more of a 50% rate, but I don’t know if that’s for the USA or worldwide (which I presume would be lower, given the retention problems I saw in Honduras).

  4. alea
    July 18, 2006 at 2:14 pm #

    The one that wigged me out the most was Decatur Co, IA (the fifth little square from the west in that state). Turns out, that’s the site of Graceland University, the Community of Christ’s school. Lamoni’s a major centre for them.

    As for the isolated splotches, who besides Mormons would settle Boundary Co, ID or middle of nowhere NV? Have you been to Coeur d’Alene?

  5. March 28, 2013 at 2:45 pm #

    It would be interesting to see what non-christian religions are in the us. And if any area is largely non christian. I would imagine not, but its a little to strange of a bias not to even consider anyting but christian church bodies.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. More Good Foundation Blog » America’s Religions by Region - July 12, 2006

    […] ref=”http://blog.moregoodfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/church_bodies.jpg”> Source: American’s Regional Religions

    Categories: Mormon, Cool Sites, Posted a […]

  2. Latter-day Blog - July 18, 2006

    US Religeons in 2000

    To gratify Connor, I’ve given us the green Jell-O flavor he so desired

    *Thanks Brandon for the quick photoshop help.

  3. More Good Foundation Blog » Religiones de los Estados Unidos de América por Región - September 21, 2006

    […] Fuente: American’s Regional Religions (Religiones Regionales de los Estados Unidos de América) Categories: Mormon, Posted at 10:10 am […]

  4. America’s Religions by Region | More Good Foundation Blog - March 28, 2013

    […] Source: American’s Regional Religions […]

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